Jimmy Dorsey Standard so

So much for Jimmy Dorsey Standard.

Bob Eberly & Helen O'Connell. Read Jimmy Dorsey's full text Green Eyes by Jimmy Dorsey: The Complete Standard Transcriptions Album. Somewhere so deep that in my quest. from someone other than myself. Collaborated with Benny Goodman, Kay Kyser, Tommy Dorsey and others.

Jimmy Dorsey, School of Modern Rhythm.

Content: This method was developed to help students of all levels understand the new concepts and ideas of modern music. To achieve this, they used the character of Jimmy Dorsey, a great exponent of swing music and one of the greatest performers of the years ââ??â"¢â"¢â"¢30, as the linchpin.

On the first pages he explains not only the history of the saxophone and Jimmy Dorsey, but also the assembly process, the meaning of the different parts of the saxophone and the correct posture when playing standing and sitting. Like any decent method, this one includes the explanation of the basic terms: standard and covered fingering, changes, symbols, scales, arpeggios, exercises, etc.; the really interesting part, however, are the chapters on double/three-reed strike, vibrato and especially improvisation.

In addition, there are some examples of personal interpretations of Jimmy Dorsey in the form of â'¬Å"a soloââ'¬Â and reproductions of excerpts from his compositions. The selling price of this method is about 17 Euros with the enclosed CD, so a very ridiculous number for all affordable, but is also available as a version without CD.

Interesting for the CD, it's a pity that in "So Rare" (Dorsey's best-selling piece) the alto saxophone doesn't play it...... Good Cmq work and many thanks for the review. Anyway, as you said, it would be ideal for the beginner to be accompanied by a master who explains the different exercises at the same time.

For the syncopes I have taken it intentionally because they were and are my black animals, so I find it very useful to improve myself..... Interesting the CD, it's a pity that in "So Rare" (Dorsey's best-selling track) the alto saxophone doesn't play it... Unfortunately I have to be satisfied with an old LP, then that I didn't know it in this track, in which he didn't play the alto, at least it's very catchy.

Another song I like a lot, but I've never heard it before, is Hollywood Pastime, it's one of the scores included in the method, and it's very fascinating. On Wki Jimmy is given the uncommon vocal solos but more; once I've read that it was Dick Stable who did it, it seems to me a style too different from Dorsey's...it seems to be almost rocks and rolls.....

The Hollywood Pastime was one of my favorites, but aime' I never had the pleasure to hear it. For me, too, this was the very first method to be trimmed together with my first Conn museum instrument: apart from the photos of the smiling mouthpiece, the subtitle should be Monty Pythons: A Complete Loss of Time's; the music is not only very bad, it doesn't explain anything at all to you....

Even for me the only thing I found inspiring was to play Hollywood Pastime, then luckily I found a teacher and began to really study the technique and the music, with Giampieri and Salviani, and Niehaus and Viola at the same time. The latter in particular opens up unexpected and stimulating paths in rhythmic studies, apart from the editing time and the syncope of Dorsey!

Everyone is free to spend their money and time as they see fit. Grin sen: By the way, Dorsey is a good SWING Jazzmusician, but nothing like his brother IMHO, and in any case this is a method they use for all beginners, but to call it a method seems exaggerated to me: Maybe it should be visited again if you already have a certain technical and interpretative ability to evaluate it correctly:

However, I did not do it because in the meantime I have found other studies and methods that I find very interesting: Marienthal, Nelson, Niehaus, Rossi; creating a basis is essential to take the first steps with an experienced and competent teacher who knows how to read a method like Dorsey in between. Isaak' s review remains, however, and we must thank her! Methods that I find very interesting: Marienthal, Nelson, Niehaus, Rossi; they check: saputello!

Even for me the only thing that I found stimulating was to play Hollywood Pastime, then fortunately I found a teacher and began to really study the technique and the musicHi Sax O' phone, you are absolutely right, if you have no basic minimum, it could frighten the poor man who reads it until death.

Fortunately, I already came from studying Bona and another method that doesn't bother me now, so when I switched to Tenor, I saw in this method perhaps playing ugly exercises, but useful for the context I was looking for to improve myself. Anyway, it is true that there are better methods, the same Bona was for me a good reference point for the Solfeggio and everything else.

Seriously, Dorsey is a good swing musician, but nothing like his brother IMHOScusa asks me, I could be wrong, his brother wasn't called Tommy? or refer to some abbreviations in the Code of Empiric. Tommy, he had played in the Jimmy Orchestra for a while, then after a diatribe he formed his own orchestra, but although it wasn't bad, he wasn't as successful as his brother.

Tommy, he had played in the Jimmy Orchestra for a while, then after a diatribe he formed his own orchestra, but although it wasn't bad, he wasn't as successful as his brother. In my humble opinion (IMHO), Tommy was much more interesting as a musician, although he didn't have the same success as Jimmy, which I find stereotypical and commercial.....

In my humble opinion (IMHO), Tommy was much more interesting as a musician, although he didn't have the same success as Jimmy, which I find stereotypical and commercial..... Acco China Age IMHO Married! Unfortunately I only have one old Jimmy LP and since I never heard Tommy (except in Maple Leaf Rag), my judgment is not very reliable, so I trust what you say.

As I said, these are my very personal views: Certainly Jimmy Dorsey was much more productive, and he was also more successful as a composer, with pieces that actually became standard (e.g. "I'm Glad There is You"); some of his pieces would also be fun to play in an orchestra like Dusk in Upper Sandusky, Oodles of Noodles, Beebe.....

Anyway, I find this method at least outdated... I have it!!!!!!!! It does not seem to be suitable for a beginner (like me).......... Then I used it with the master at my side, so it's a little more help. It was my first saxophone manual!

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