Folksy Songs

Popular songs

Folksy" | La Collins official English-Italian dictionary online. Prepare to enrich your playlists with these fantastic folk sounds. Playlist of popular Italian favourites, based on Neapolitan folk songs and such recognizable melodies as O Sole Mio. Popular style with disco dance songs and heartfriendly ballads. It grows in the harsh climate of the southern Swiss Alps, where it leads to hot moods and popular songs.

Folksong - Italian translation

Montenegro may be small, but it is honorable and equitable. Montenegrina: "il Montenegro scarà fürse Piccolo, ma è on-orevole en giusto". from the Middle Ages. Freedom is rather "the highest ambition that the whole world can aspire to", to quote an old Swedish medieval folk song from the Middle Ages.

Freedom is rather "the highest ambition that the whole world can aspire to", to quote an old Swedish folk song from the Middle Ages.

BALLAD/BALLat FOLK archive - Page 16 of 24 - FOLK BALLAD/Ballat Popolari - FOLK BALLAD/Ballat POLOLAR archive - Page 16 of 24 - BALLAD FOLK BALLAD/BALLat POLOLAR archive - page 16 of 24 - FOLK BALLAD BALLAD BALLAT BALLAT BALLAT BALLAT BALLOLAR BALLOLAR BALLOLAR BALLAT BALLAR BALLAT BALLOLAR BALLOLAR BELARTICH BELAR

The beggar finds shelter for the night on a farm, the farmer's beautiful daughter lets herself be seduced in the hope of being a disguised gentleman, the two often flee together. The girl agrees with the beggar to run away from home and finds his happiness because the beggar is actually a transvestite gentleman who wanted to test the girl's feelings before marrying her.

The pretty little girl gave him the look. Such as the snows on the yoon fell-dyke(7), "O leave ie, leaveie, you are much too young and you do not have the swing of the Begging Tongues, you do not have the swing of the Begging Tongues, "I will strain my back and I will bow my stifle, " "I will bow my back and I will bow my back, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bend my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bow my knees, I will bend my knees, I to be young and you you you you who will be too young and you you not being strong and you will be not be strong and you will be not be strong, you you will be not be strong, you you you you will be not be strong this full of the body

I' ll mark a dark spot on my E'e, and for a pauper they'll take me, for all the gates were pretty much shut, / The old lady stood up in the night, / The old lady stood up in the night, / For to find the old man away.

The old lady went to wake the maid:/ The cot was there, but the servant girl was gone, away with the feeble man. Seven years had gone by and away, in search of his charity: "I have never accommodated one but one, and with him my girl has formed a band, "If you want to see your girl, she has two children on her leg, and a third passes by.

and with him my only daughter is left, and I would prefer it if there were only you left: As far as she lives and as far as she lives, the most beautiful girl in all Scotland, what the ballad does to us in a collection of Sea Shanties, is not quite clear, except for the absurd choir, it was probably such a popular song that it landed on the ships!

He put him in a corner of a smokestack with a Too-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Rantin Hi, Too-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Ro-Rantin Hi, He put his cloak on a hitch. Slapping and slapping and slapping and slapping and slapping and slapping again, says He's got my girl! Never have I placed anyone but one, and with him my daugther is gone, so joyfully can you join together.

Do you want to see your girl now, with two knees and one more? She clapped her hands and said: And with him my only girl left, and I would prefer that it was only you, that she lived far and wide, the most beautiful girl in the whole country, and hurry to find these sneaks!

With the title "Hi for the beggar" "A beggar's comb owes the money", "A beggar, A beggar", "The old beggar", "The beggar", "The beggar" or "The man's fork lunzie" the story is always the same: The beggar finds shelter for the night on a farm, the farmer's beautiful daughter is seduced in the hope that she is a camouflaged gentleman, the two often flee together.

This version of the ballad is still popular in Scotland, especially in Aberdeenshire and Perthshire. A not very popular traditional song, first recorded by Pete Bellamy in 1968 in his Mainly Folk Songs&Ballads record (in the sheet music he writes "the voice of Norfolk's Peter Bullen"), as there are no tracks before the date, as some believe that the song is a variation by Peter Bullen on an old folk story, which is also shared by titles like "Blow Boys Blow" and "Do Me Alma", albeit with a different melody.

The most famous seaside resort in Norfolk is located east of the town of Norfolk and stretches over 15 kilometres of beach. A sailor's hymn instead of a sailor's hymn, which takes up in a humorous way the classical theme of the nocturnal visiting songs, which describe nocturnal encounters between beautiful and more or less "naive" girls and soldiers or sailors.

He had a beautiful girl with gold bristles, and he asked her for her hands. "And if you will tarry with me, I will bind a piece of cord around my fingers; and when he came by, he drew the cord; he had never seen such a vision. And in the early hours of the day he went back to his crews, then he explained to them about the mass for his daughters, the beautiful little thing with the gold coat. Fifteen seamen drew down on the line / it came down and she let them all in.

So, all the young men who go to Yarmouth, if you see a beautiful little gal with low drooping head of fur, all you have to do is draw the cord, Solla Spaggia, uneosuccia con i capeelliiondi. At the time of the closure, the sailor returned to the tavern on the beach and she went down and let him in.

The sailor was a little surprised when she winked at him with beautiful eyes, he had never seen such a show before: the string around his finger was everything she wore! to tell everything about the beautiful girl, the beautiful little thing with blond hair. There were fifteen sailors pulling on the rope, she came down and let them all in. If you see a beautiful girl with loose hair (at the window), all you have to do is pull the rope, she will come down and let you in!

The girl, as a serious and posed girl, rejects any "progress" because already promised. Reminiscent of the archetypal figures of Odysseus and Penelope, the Ballade reminds us that Odysseus, who returns to his disguised Ithaca twenty years after the war (and his vicissitudes in the seas), is not recognised by his wife. All versions were collected in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and North America by A.L. Lloyd and have a common matrix in the Ballade, which was published on a broadsheet printed by James Catnach (London 1813-1838) Flemish, in "The New Green Mountain Songster", pp. 36-38, noted: "The Luft, in which it is performed almost everywhere, both in the old and in the US traditions, is part of another Baltic song, "The Female Smuggler".

When I went for a walk one night (omitted), it was summer (time) to take a breath / a woman (virgin) spyed with a seaman guy / and I was standing there to sit and I was standing there to sit and sit and sit and listen to what they could say / sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit and sit for a while. It has been seven long years(1) since he has abandoned this country, one half of the ring is still here with me, he said: "You can expel him from your head / for another young man whom you will find safe.

Thus maidens are real when your beloved is at see when I went a beautiful summer evening what was said. and a ring which he slipped out of his white hand (2). The oldest version of the ballad tells of two merchant ships, the George Aloe, and the sweepstake with the George Aloe, who avenges the sinking of the second ship with the same "courtesy" to the crew of the French pirate ship that threw the crew of the sweepstake into the ocean.

"Looking forward, looking backward, and the other of the "Prince of Wales", looking forward, looking backward, "There is nothing backward, sir, the ballad gains popularity again in the years between 1795 and 1815 in connection with the attacks of the Barbary corsairs on American ships. "Fighting for the neighborhood, fighting for the neighborhood", With knife and weapon, O we struggled for hour three; But O!

The ballad is relatively rare in the oral tradition, it was found in North America in Scotland, England and Ireland, and the hypothesis was also put forward that the versions found in America were influenced by the Irish tradition. I was riding in the hallway one evening and the light of the moon shone clearly; I heard a beautiful young maiden crying for her love.

You will marry my youngest son and you will be his bride, you will be his bride, lady, so beautiful among the beauties. From time to time, however, the girl manages to triumph over the murderous male desires with cunning, so that she turns into a predator in the "(Fair) Magd am Ufer"!

It is a mermaid that the captain sees on a moonlit night and walks along the beach (it is known that mermaids). She falls in love immediately and sends a lifeboat to bring the girl to her ship (with the good or the bad), but as soon as she sings, she bewitches the whole crew. and... expensive Ware-o (2).

They say: "Madame, please come aboard to admire a load of beautiful goods, they took her aboard with a lot of talk, and back to the ship they manoeuvred, back to the ship that manoeuvred, she sang pure, sweet and perfect; she sang so that the sailors and the captain would fall asleep.

In the Scandinavian versions of the story, the girl is first lured aboard the ship with flattery and then kidnapped. In the French version, The Epee Liberator is a princess who boards the ship because she wants to learn the song sung by the young Hub:

There' s a young virgin, let the breeze blast up, let the breeze blast down, I will kill, I will kill, I have a lot of silvery, I will share, I will share, I will share, after a lot of convincing she is so beautiful and tidy, then she stole it, then she stole it, and I will kill her, I men must be mad, your men were not mad and found nothing to comfort his soul that sailed across the ocean, I have so much gold in his cabin below deck that he forgot all the pain and sorrow.

In his cabin below deck she was so beautiful and pure, she sang to make the captain fall asleep, and the sailors fell asleep. She robbed him of valuable things, and she rode back to the beach because you escaped from such a cheerful hut and you returned to the beach. 5 ) in Renbourn's version, the sentence is clearer, they are the pain of love that the captain tries to alleviate by raping the girl! to kayak her back to the bank, again I am a virgin on the bank, goodbye to all grief and cares (3).

Sailing on a beautiful ship, when I can't have the girl on the beach, take her on board, let her sit next to her own chair and invited her into her cabin, - shouted this beautiful virgin.

The captain wept with joy, she sang so friendly, so sweet, robbed her of her jewels, robbed her of her health, and rode to return to the beach, to the beach, to the beach, to the beach, and rode to return to the beach.

"In the oldest version of the ballad, known as The Baffled Knight, a young and inexperienced jumper meets a virgin in the field and asks her to have sex, but the virgin makes fun of her inexperience in love and makes her play it.

The ballad is reported in many text versions both in the 18th century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as orally in Great Britain and America under the title "Blow (Clear)(Stroll) Away The Morning Dew"; the male protagonist is from time to time a gentlemen or a shepherd boy / farmer. The courtly ballad from the Renaissance period of the "Cavaliere Beffato" is now transferred into a popular context and connects it with an old Celtic ritual, which is still practiced today by the farmers, bathing in the dew of Beltane.

The text version of the ballad was slightly retouched and reduced to the form of a humorous song. Looking high, looking low, throwing a look under, floating in a stream. "`I will not move your cloak, I will leave your garments alone, He has put them on a milky-white horse, Himself on another, Like sisters and Like brothers.

Spying on a few tails of straw, they ring the ring for a long time to let the youngster in. That young gal she leapt into, and I'm a servant indoors! "There is a daisy in my father's yard, it's named Ringelblume, The Jester who won't if he can, says the shepherd's boy as he takes off his boots, Disse lei "Signore, non tooccate il mi million Mantello, lasciate rigid i meiei ventiti.

And she said, "Young man, there's a place where you and I can lie." Said: "Young man, I am a servant girl inside, so it is when you come to a beautiful servant girl, a miles outside the city, a cercare di implallinare qualitcosa, che undava a passeggio per la strada. Here it is. She ran in and closed the door, locked out the young man, sire.

Take your Bible under your arms, go to a little bit more junior high, sire. Just below the city, syr; Or the growling of your dress, syr. Does not want to enter the chicken (1), syr; That you are one of them, syr. detto calendula, sigore, 1) Now the insult is explicit: The boy is powerless, in the Irish versions the most common sentence is: "When they went up to sleep, sure the cove that he was not able" A young knight who walked through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she bathes in a river) and asks her to have sex.

The girl in this version is a woman who testifies that it was not advisable for the honest girls of the past to walk unaccompanied; in fact, no good family girl would ever dare to walk alone in public places (and less than in woods and fields that were not family-owned), and even if Jane Austen a century later accustomed us to seeing the English landscape populated by young girls walking on foot, rarely did they leave records alone.

In the oldest version of the ballad, a young and inexperienced jumper meets a girl in the field and asks her to have sex, but the girl makes fun of her inexperience in love and makes him do it. Over the centuries and the oral transmission, the context of the ballad becomes more prosaic and the girl no longer plays with fire, but strives to protect her virtue from rape.

In 1963 Nina Simone lived at Carnegie Hall in New York (on the album "Folksy Nina" 1964). A young knight walking through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she is bathing in a river) and asks her to have sex. But in this ballad the girl is a woman, and the dialogue between the two protagonists becomes more of a gallant battle of love, a game of love to make him more appetizing, but the jumper, because of his young age, does not yet know the rules and is therefore teased by the woman, courtesan of much experienced and cynical, skilful maneuver of his lovers!

The ballad was originally transcribed in Thomas Ravenscroft's Deuteromelia (1609) with a melody that he attributes to the reign of Henry VIII. He said: "If I were a kingdom and had a crown, you would be a kingdom, a beautiful woman who is lonely.

Also Ioue sowe du, faire Lady(4), Among the rose's which are so reddish; If I do not cut my will of you, full solitude, faire lady, then he looks eastward, then he looks west, He e looks westward, heee looks northerly, so he looks southward; He could not find a place pray for all were in the Diuels orifice.

If you will bear me, dear Lord, a Mayde(5) vnt into the lair of my dad, then you shall bear your will from me, He has placed you a horse and he himself a horse, and all along the whole working days he has ridden them past as if they had been brothers and sisters. You had me," she says, "abroad in the fields, between the cornea, in the middle of the grass, where you had your will of me, because in good belief, I said no again, Sire.

Under the storms that were so brown where you had your will of me, his walnut browsward ( 11 ), and wipe off the grid with his snake so that every wife would besiege ( 12 )! Either a kilometer or two from the city, do not replace their faggy clothes, Da me ting giunse un cavity camaliere gortese, cheese Ramzolava Lausurioso per i camps; the city is a place where you can find a lot of people; the city is a place where you can find a lot of people; With Jupiter beautiful lady, whom you have sent under the lush leaves, if I were king and wore the crown, soon beautiful lady, you would be my queen.

IIIThat Jupiter will hold you beautiful lady, red under the roses if I don't make you mine, and then look west, look north and south too, but couldn't find a secluded place that was in the devil's clutches. and rode beside them all day long, as if they were sister and brother. was now well on his way and excluded the silly ass.

1 )'lay' = meadowland: the young man is information, he only has to see a single lady for the campaign! 2) Interweaving of onomatopoetic and seemingly nonsensical ballads, also in the ballad The Three Ravenssre, which Ravenscoft always reports in his melismata this time. In the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) we find that "down" can be used as an inverse either attribute or by means of an ellipsis of a certain term in the meaning of "dejected".

"" In addition, we note that "a" can be used as a pre-position as in "a live" or as an adjective for " everything", and that "hay" can be used as an intermediate remark for "you have (it)", and that it appears in the sentence "making hay", which means "creating confusion".

Regarding line four, we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that "with" can be used to create inverse words that designate "fully". If we check this year with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956), we find that Londonderry once bore the name "Derry".

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